Consider supporting Yampa River Botanic Park on Colorado Gives Day, December 8, 2015

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Coming June 2016 North American Rock Garden Society Annual Meeting in Steamboat !

Work on the 2016 NARGS Annual meeting in Steamboat Springs June 23-27 is progressing apace. We will be using the newly rebuilt Colorado Mountain College Campus which offers spectacular views of the Yampa Valley for the conference and several local hotels/campgrounds for lodging. A series of local garden tours, hikes to see Rocky Mountain flowers in the wild , plant sales, book sales and signing by local and nationally known authors will round out the conference. A potpourri of regional, national and international speakers will cover various aspects of the world's steppes and semiarid mountain ranges with reference to the garden as well as the wild. Several hikes on both Saturday 25 and Sunday 26 showcasing a variety of habitats and suitable for different levels of ability are planned. A great wildflower display this year will hopefully be repeated in 2016.

The Yampa River Botanic Park

Steamboat Springs Colorado Botanic Park

Beginning in 1995 the Yampa River Botanic Park sprang from a flat horse pasture to a six acre gem of ponds, berms, and over 50 gardens. It is one of the jewels of Northwest Colorado and one of a handful of botanic gardens in the State. The Park is on land donated to the City of Steamboat Springs. The facility is directed by a board of interested citizens who oversee the Park's operations and raise funds through memberships, donations, sponsorships and grants. The Park receives no tax dollars.

Steamboat Springs Botanic Park

Music on the Green

The Park is free and open to the public from the beginning of May through the end of October. It is a place to enjoy the flowers and the trees, a place to revel in Nature and a hideaway from the stress of modern life. It is a place for summer music festivals, a place for weddings and yoga and a resource to see native plants. The Yampa River starts at 12,000 feet in the Flattop mountains, 50 miles to the south, and empties into the Green River at 4,000 feet, 120 miles to the West, and eventually into the mighty Colorado. The Park sits at 6800 feet above sea level, but, through the use of microclimates designed into the Park, it supports both alpine plants and desert plants found in the Yampa River Basin.

Summer 2015 video newsletter